J-K-L  There are no products in this category

Subcategories

  • JANEQUIN (CLÉMENT)
    • Clément JANEQUIN (1485-1558) 

    • Composer, cantor and priest, Janequin was known throughout Europe. Originally from Poitou, he was born Châtellerault in 1485 and, according to Ronsard, would have been a disciple of Josquin des Prés.
    • In 1505, Janequin joined the magistrate and humanist Lancelot du Fau in Bordeaux, who became bishop of Luçon in 1515. That same year, Janequin would have taken part in the battle of Marignan, source of inspiration for La Bataille, one of his most famous songs. After the death of Lancelot du Fau, the composer entered the service of Jean de Foix, archbishop of Bordeaux. • In fact, very little is known of his life until 1529, when he was Bordeaux and composed a play to celebrate the peace of Cambrai. It was around this time that Pierre Attaingnant (or Attaignant) and other European publishers began to print his polyphonic songs.
    • In 1530, François Ier and his court stayed in Bordeaux. For the king’s entry, Janequin composed Chantons, sonnez Trumpets, which earned its author the title of King’s Cantor. In 1530, Janequin settled in Angers. He was chapel master of Saint-Maurice cathedral from 1534 to 1537. Around 1540, he stayed regularly in Paris and settled there definitively in 1549. He became the protégé of Cardinal Jean de Lorraine and Duke François de Guise who made his chaplain and his musician. 
    • Clément Janequin has composed more than four hundred secular vocal works, fifty spiritual songs, eighty psalms and two masses. Considered as the master of the “Parisian song”, Janequin renews the profane song (spiritual and sentimental, even saucy and often Rabelaisian) and invents descriptive or imitative music. Vast frescoes such as La Bataille de Marignan, Le Chant des Oiseaux, La Chasse au Cerf or Les Cris de Paris, which play with words or onomatopoeias are considered models of Renaissance vocal music. As for licentious or love songs, they announce what will later be the madrigal of the Renaissance.
    • At the end of his life, during the reign of King Henry II, Janequin was appointed ordinary composer (titular) in the royal chapel. Despite his success and his fame, Clément Janequin died destitute, as evidenced by his will.
  • KUNC (ALOYS)

    Aloys KUNC (1832-1895)

    • Aloys Kunc is a French composer from Languedoc, organist and teacher. He was considered in his time as a plain-chant specialist. Chapel master of the cathedral of Toulouse from 1870, he created in 1875 the review Musica Sacra (later Music Sacred), where many scores of religious pieces from the last quarter of the nineteenth century were published including César Franck, Alexandre Guilmant, Eugène Gigout.
    • Aloys KUNC's compositions include masses, motets and numerous musics for the organ. He wrote for the inauguration of the Basilica du Sacré-Coeur de Montmartre in Paris, a very famous hymn (save, save France!). Two of his sons followed his path as a composer: Aymé Kunc (Prix de Rome in 1902) and Pierre Kunc. 
    • © Didier Chagnas
  • LALLEMENT (BERNARD)

    Bernard LALLEMENT (1936 - ) 

    • Bernard Lallement, choirmaster, founder of the Franco-German choirs, former administrator of the choral international non-profit organization A Coeur Joie, contributed to the renewal and dissemination of popular and traditional music.
    • His perfect knowledge of this repertoire, his curiosity and his "pioneering" spirit allowed him to reveal to the general public multiple songs from the French provinces and many countries (Canada, Ireland, England, etc.).
    • Harmonizations and arrangements, cantatas on popular themes by Bernard Lallement are performed all over the world.
    • Bernard Lallement collaborates with Musiques en Flandres in the research and publication of traditional songs from Flanders, Picardy, and in general from the Hauts de France region
  • LASSO (ORLANDO)
  • LECOCQ (Charles)
    • Charles Lecocq (1832-1918)

    • Charles Lecocq is a French composer born June 3, 1832. Of modest origin and following an illness which forced him to use crutches, he began to give piano lessons at the age of 16 and joined the Paris Conservatoire where he has fellow students such as Bizet and Saint-Saëns.
    • Following a competition launched in 1856 by Jacques Offenbach to write the stage music for Doctor Miracle, he was appointed co-tied with Bizet, but became angry with Offenbach. For 10 years, he composed scene music or pieces in one act, with more or less success.
    • In 1872, he moved to Belgium in Brussels where his works enjoyed a certain success. "La Fille de Madame Angot" (Madame Angot's daughter) won a triumph which was followed by that of "Giroflé-Girofla" (1874).
    • In 1878 "Le Petit Duc" was created in Paris where 300 performances were given.
    • Charles Lecocq becomes the successor or even the rival of Jacques Offenbach. His works later became more or less interesting because he used the same "recipes" and thus tired his audience.
    • In 1887 with Ali Baba he returned to Brussels with success. Two ballets were created in 1898 and 1899, Barbe Bleu and Le cygne.
    • Charles Lecocq died in Paris on October 24, 1918, when the First World War began.
    • In addition to his fifty stage music, Charles Lecocq has composed several books of piano pieces, as well as a hundred melodies
  • LE FLEM (PAUL)
    • Paul Le Flem, 1881-1984, professor, choirmaster, music critic, composer. Born into a family very attached to Brittany, died in Tréguier in the Côtes d'Armor at the age of 103 years. His works are inspired by music from the 15th and 16th centuries, evoke the landscapes, legends and songs of Breton folklore and reveal the influence of Claude Debussy, between modality and atonality.
    • Graduate of philosophy, the former Bergson's student at the Sorbonne (1901) composes melodies on poems by Verlaine (Ariette oubliée, Mandoline, Soleil couchants, 1904) and, later in his life, Max Jacob (Morven le Gaëlique , six poems, 1963) and Benjamin Perret (Courir sur un mIroir, 1955).
    • After having worked at the Schola Cantorum with Vincent d'Indy and Albert Roussel (1904), Le Flem taught counterpoint there from 1923 to 1934. Érik Satie, André Jolivet, Marcel Mihalovic, Roland-Manuel were among his students.
    • His career as a music critic in present time and then in daily Comœoedia allows him to forge multiple ties with the musicians of his time. From 1913, he defended the modernity of Igor Stravinsky, Serge Lifar and Darius Milhaud (Le Sacre du Printemps, 1913.
    • Le Flem's lyric work borrows greatly from the tales and legends of Brittany. It includes "Aucassin et Nicolette", 1909, after an anonymous fable song from the 12th-13th century, Le rossignol de Saint-Malo, 1938, La magicienne de la mer, 1954, La Maudite, (1966-1968) according to the Breton legend of the city of Ys and Dahut, magician and princess who bewitched him all his life.
    • We find the love of freedom and the open sea, the proximity of strikes and moors, the song of broom and death in works for orchestra such as Les Voix du Large (1911) and Pour les Morts (1913) inspired of a Breton hymn. He also harmonized many popular songs, most of which remained unpublished and published for the first time at Editions Musiques en Flandres.
    • Paul Le Flem remains a composer with great melodic and harmonic sensitivity anchored in the depths of Celtic emotion and soul.
    • © Didier Chagnas
  • LISZT (FRANZ)
  • LOTTI (ANTONIO)
    • Antonio Lotti (1667-1740) Italian composer and organist.
    • The first part of his life is spent in Hanover where his father Matteo is chapel master of the Electoral Court.
    • Back to Venice, he becomes a pupil of Giovanni Legrenzi and enters the service of Saint Mark's Basilica where he climbs all the levels, singer then assistant organist before becoming first titular organist from 1704. He then become (1736) Maître de Chapelle at Saint-Marc (Capella Marciana), a position he holds until his death.
    • Married (1708) to the soprano Santa Stella (Santina), he obtained leave (in 1717) to go with his Italian troop to Dresden, capital of the prince elector of Saxony where several of his operas are represented.
    • He returned to Venice in 1719 and remained there until his death. He abandoned his stage activities to devote himself to sacred and instrumental music. A sought-after professor, he teaches orphans at the Ospedale degli Incurabili, an establishment sought after by the Venetian nobility.
    • Like many musicians of his time, Lotti composed in all genres: twenty masses with three or four voices, fifty cantatas, motets, madrigals, thirty operas and secular instrumental music. His sacred a cappella works are in a traditional polyphonic style but many other works are written with accompaniment of strings and basso continuo.
    • The Miserere for four voices (1734) and the Crucifixus (1718) for six, eight and ten voices (three versions) are considered among the most beautiful of their time.
  • LULLY (JEAN-BAPTISTE)
    • Born in Florence in Tuscany, Giovanni Battista Lulli (1632-1687) arrived in Paris at the age of thirteen. He entered the service of King Louis XIV at twenty and, in 1653, he danced alongside the fifteen-year-old king in the Ballet Royal de la Nuit, a performance given before the Court by Cardinal de Mazarin, winner of the Fronde. Eight years later, naturalized and having francized his name, Jean-Baptiste Lully becomes Superintendent of Music in the King's Chamber.
    • For a decade, Lully collaborated with Molière in numerous comedies-ballets (Georges Dandin, the Magnificent Lovers, Monsieur de Pourceaugnac, Le Bourgeois gentilhomme, ...) until their quarrel in 1671.
    • After the purchase in 1672 of the privilege attached to the Royal Academy of Music which he directs, until his death in 1687, the composer reigns supreme over the music of the Sun King.
    • With his lyrical tragedy, Lully is considered to be the creator of French opera based on recitative and ballet. Lully is also behind the opening "à la française", the form of which extends to all of Europe. He also composes around twenty motets including Les Grands Motets with double choir for the Royal Chapel.
    • While conducting a rehearsal of his Te Deum to celebrate the healing of Louis XIV, the musician injured his foot with the cane which he used to beat time. Gangrene prevails a few months later. The cane will be changed in favor, from now on, of the less dangerous wand ...


      • © Didier Chagnas